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Canadian Rockies and Art

Yesterday I had the privilege of observing and talking with a local Canadian Artist in her home town of Banff, Alberta.   Canadian born, Christine Ford has spent most of her life in the breath-taking Canadian Rockies.  Passion for her home, the beautiful Rockies; and painting, is very clear when talking with Christine.  Her passion also comes through in her paintings.  This very personable young artist was more than happy to talk about her beginnings, art techniques, struggles in art, and much more.

There is a recurring theme when I talk with artists or read art related articles (beside practice 😉 ) and that is to find ways to surround yourself with art (and artists).  This will keep you drawing, painting, and creating.  Unless art is your livelihood, where you must paint to pay the bills, it needs nurturing daily to grow.  It gives you a reason and purpose to do art.  What does this look like?  I think for me it means taking a course, setting some goals, entering competitions, being active in an art society, and  even doing some commission work.

If you haven’t visited the Canadian Rockies, plan a trip – it will be well worth it.  I have been to the majestic Canadian mountains many times, and each time I go,  it is like I am seeing them again for the very first time.

Photographs taken by Martin Eisbrenner.  Check out his website…some really cool photos!!!

If you want to learn more about Christine Ford check out her website at www.christineford.ca

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Stippling: Working With Pen-and-Ink

Pointillism is a form of painting using many tiny dots of primary colors to create secondary colors.  This form of painting is very long and laborious and not a very common form used by many artists, however it does create beautiful optical results.  Even though the sleeping dog above is not “painted” using color, it is still created using many tiny dots (points) using pen and ink.  This technique is known as stippling, using dots to create a variety of less and more dense areas.  This technique creates the optical feel of depth where the dots are more concentrated.

Sleeping

In my snow leopard piece titled,Watching I also used stippling to create depth and form.

This technique was developed in late 1880 by George Seurat, a French  painter. http://www.georgesseurat.org/

Also check out Artsy which features 16 artworks by George Seurat, exclusive articles, related artists, and exhibit listings of Seurat works

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Students Connecting – Art and History

I have always considered the arts a valuable tool in creating life long learning for both my children and myself.  Yesterday I read an article (“Object Lesson”) by Marice Rose that explains a way of engaging students in art, history, culture, and society.  It shows how to help students define art.  Understanding the meaning and value of art helps students (we are all students after all – life long learners :)) develop a human connection to it.

And much more…it’s a good read.

http://www.arteducators.org/research/AE_July2012_Rose.pdf

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The Herdsman

This sketch of The Herdsman was one of my early sketches (2010).   I was experimenting with different grades of pencil lead to see what values and textures I could create.  It turned out better than I expected, and I had fun doing it.

“Practice only makes for improvement”  -Les Brown

And so, I continue to practice!

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Pergamon Art

What better way to start an art blog than with a photograph (top of page) of a Roman stone tile from the Pergamon Museum in Berlin.  I had the privilege of visiting Berlin in 2009 with my family, and all I could say was, “wow!”  The culture, the life, the history, and the vast variety in art woke something in me that will not go away.  The more I explore the world of art, the more I need to know.  Who knows where this exploration will go but let the journey begin.