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art, Charcoal

Canadian Musicians – Diverse, Rich

Celebrating Canadian Musicians

Canadian Musicians
Charcoal on Tan Paper, Sketchbook – Leonard Cohen

Diverse and rich, Canada celebrated its 150th birthday this past summer.  This focus led me to explore many facets of Canada’s history.  As I journeyed through some of its histories I was reminded of the countless Canadian musicians that have laid a rich musical foundation for our society.  I love music – all types of music.   Celebrating some of these musicians through drawing seems like a good fit. 

Working with Tan Paper
Canadian Musicians
Charcoal on Tan Paper, Sketchbook – Gordon Lightfoot

With a variety of subjects in mind and a goal set out, I have decided to explore the warmth and tone that tan paper can add to a drawing.  After purchasing a new Strathmore Toned Paper sketchbook and grabbing my charcoal pencils, I set out to sketch and learn more about the various artists that have enriched Canada. Three Canadian Artists portrait’s that I completed this summer include Leonard Cohen, Gordon Lightfoot, and Terri Clark.  Each of these musicians has helped shape Canada’s musical landscape.  I will post more information on each artist in the upcoming weeks.

 Canadian Musicians/Hand Lettering
Canadian Musicians
Charcoal on Tan Paper, Sketchbook – Terri Clark

Deciding that I should continue to develop my hand lettering skills, I plan on incorporating hand lettering with each portrait in upcoming posts.  As I continue drawing portraits of more Canadian Musicians, I will incorporate hand lettering. The hand lettering will give more information about each artist.  Although Canada is only 150 years old, it is wonderfully rich and a diverse musical country which should be celebrated.  I look forward to exploring more Canadian musicians as I grow and develop as an artist.

If you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please feel free to comment below or send me an email at eisycindy@gmail.com.  Thank you for joining me on this journey.  I look forward to seeing where it will lead.

You can also follow me on Instagram for more photograph updates at eisycindy.

 

art, Portrait

Old Window Treasure – Portraits

For some time now I have wanted to draw portraits of my three children and  incorporate these portraits into a rustic window frame.  Well, I have the frame and have completed one portrait.  The challenge that I have is what style do I want these portraits to be?  Which look will satisfy my eye?  Soft?  …maybe heavy, or loose?  What style would complement both the window frame and the artwork? There is never any harm in doing multiple portraits.  In fact, the process of pairing portraits with the frame is a great exercise.  With endless combinations and many questions to be answered, the best way for me to learn is to jump right in and try a collection of different styles.

Softer Style Window Portrait

window frame portrait
Daydream

The use of graphite  in this sketch complements the dreamy nature of the pose, creating a gentle feel.    I also chose to keep the background (negative space) light to help create a balanced softness.

The Window Frame

Window Frame

This well-preserved old window frame will make a great addition to my decor.  Little needs to be done to this treasured piece, however, removing  a bit of the white paint will keep the frame and the artwork from competing for the viewer’s attention.  I am very excited to try a variety of styles to see what will unite the window and artwork into a beautiful composition.

As the summer progresses I will post updates with the different styles and pieces I create.   Feedback is always welcome and may be helpful in my decision-making process, so feel free to comment below.

Also check out:  Summer Days,

  … a deeper richer feel.

 

art, Hand Lettering

Hand Lettering-Learning, Practicing, Growing

Hand lettering is a beautiful art form which is easy to fall in love with. Its power has great impact on society.  Yes, fonts and lettering are functional, helping us communicate words, but there is so much more. Fonts can evoke emotions, tell stories, influence our mood or choices, and even trigger memories.

Here are a few examples of my hand lettering adventures:

Hand lettering

Hand lettering

 

 

Gaining skill in any new art form takes practice; muscle memory must be created to allow for lines to flow.  Remember the numerous pages of practice loops in elementary school when learning cursive writing?  Consequently, all that practice made for quick, beautiful letters which required very little thought in creating.

 

 

Hand lettering

Adobe Illustrator and Hand Lettering

Along with learning letter forms and styles of hand lettering, I decided to explore adobe illustrator.  I’ll be honest, it was the source of many headaches for me.  Determination builds strength!  I persevered, and even though I still have tons of learning to do it is getting easier.    …the headaches are less frequent.  

In this practice piece I incorporated hand lettering with illustrator.  It was fun playing with the different tools that illustrator has to offer.  Some days I felt like a kid in a candy store – too many choices.  How would I ever decide?

Hand lettering

Portrait drawing is an art form that I can completely lose myself in – hours feel like minutes.  Sometimes however, I have an innate desire to learn more and try new techniques, that is the case with lettering.  Follow my weekly progress on Instagram @eisycindy to see where my hand lettering journey takes me.

 

Related post:

Hand Lettering
The Dancer

 

Pen and Ink, Stippling

Watching – Stippling, Using Pen and Ink

Snow Leopard

Stippling with Pen and Ink

Stippling
Stippling, Snow Leopard – Pen and Ink

Many, many, many tiny dots later the leopard piece is complete.  Stippling uses tiny dots to create solid and shaded areas.  Sections that contain large concentrations of dots close together, as seen in the eyes, create depth.  Fewer dots with greater spacing are used to form the leaves producing a soft presence of the leaves. 

For this particular piece I used tinted paper.

Size: 15 X 12 completed in 2012

 

The technique of pointillism which incorporates colored dots was developed in late 1880 by George Seurat, a French  painter. http://www.georgesseurat.org/

Also check out Artsy which features 16 artworks by George Seurat, exclusive articles, related artists, and exhibit listings of Seurat works

 

Other Pen and Ink pieces on my site: 

Click on thumbnails below.

 

 

art, Pen and Ink

Pen and Ink – The Dancer: Word Art Can Add to the Beauty of Art

Pen and Ink Dancer
The Dancer

The Dancer

A few weeks ago I did a quick morning sketch of a dancer and posted it on Instagram @eisycindy. After posting, I had numerous  inquires to purchase this piece.  The quick morning sketch was done on a cheap piece of tracing paper, not something I would sell.  The interest in this piece gave me a chance to play with Hahnemuhle Sumi – E fine art paper.  The paper has a beautiful, delicate texture that I feel suits this type of drawing well.

Utilizing open lines in both the hands and the skirt helps to create a feeling of movement.  Since I have been studying letter form lately, I wanted to include words in such a way that  would add to the feel of the dancer and not distract.  Softly incorporating color in the skirt helps to increase dimension, which adds to  the free-flowing feel of the overall piece.

 

 

…love learning, learn constantly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

art, Charcoal

Charcoal Drawing – Beach Time

Charcoal Drawing
Beach Time Charcoal

 

   Sun, Fun, Sand, and a Quick   Charcoal Drawing.Lately it seems like all my art projects have been everything but drawing.  This week I really needed some draw time.  Flipping through old photographs I found a great reference picture of my little girl.  Okay, maybe she is not so little anymore, and maybe it is from fourteen years ago, but beach times were favorites of mine and I will always cherish them.

Many summers were spent sand covered, wet haired, and sun-kissed on a warm British Columbia beach.   Friends were always near.  Adventures were plentiful.  Life was simple. 

There is something pure and refreshing about working with a charcoal pencil and a blank sheet of paper.  Maybe it is the rhythm, or maybe it is the break from the focus of daily life. Whatever it is, it is good. 

For this drawing I used Meridian Drawing paper by Pentalic.  The paper is a beautiful soft white color which helps give the drawing a warm look.  It also has a great tooth which is perfect for charcoal work.  It is one of my favorite papers.

 


 Art Piece:

Beach Time  11 x 14 Charcoal Drawing

Who doesn’t like sun, fun, sand, and a little beach time?


 

Old Wood, Recycled Wood

Pallet Art – Wire Art and Clocks

Pallets With Purpose

 

Moments are precious, especially at Christmas when more time is set aside to get together with family and friends.  This is by far my favorite time of year.  I love the change in focus, in pace, and in activities.  In our fast paced world time marches forward at an ever quickening pace making it even more important to be deliberate about setting aside time for family and friends.  For me this is a constant struggle, but relentlessly I will keep trying because I treasure those moments spent with family and friends.

 Enough about me, let’s talk about the wood projects.  I really enjoy taking old wood, that no longer serves a purpose and is usually unsightly, and transforming it into something meaningful and beautiful.  Sometimes the wood pieces that I find have great character due to weathering, age, and flaws; those pieces are the ones that become the most beautiful.  I am sure there is some philosophical connection that could be made to humanity — I won’t go there, but feel free to explore those thoughts and let me know.

 

By far, the clock is my favorite piece.  Although both pieces hold a certain charm, the character in the wood pieces from the clock really give it an old world almost antiquities feel.  Incorporating wire art in the pallet projects is fast becoming a favorite for me.  I like how the rustic look of the wire plays off the old recycled wood.

 

Approximate sizes:

Clock:  20 X 20  pallet wood

Faith Plaque: 13 x 16  pallet wood and wire

 


 

 

A couple quick notes on the process.

  • Make sure your pallets are safe to use and know where the they come from.
  • Barn wood also has a lot of character and works well for wooden art                                                                                             projects and has not been used to ship chemicals.
  • Pictured are the two pallets cleaned, cut, and glued together.  (Thank you to my husband and son.)
  • To avoid having the paint bleed when doing the lettering or numbering I covered the surface with a light coat of Mod Podge.
  • I warmed up the color of the boards with acrylic craft paints mixed with Blending Gel.  The blending gel allows me to control where and how much paint I work into the wood grain by slowing the dry time down.
  • With the surface prepared, the sky is the limit — create away.
  • When I was happy with the lettering I applied a thin coat of Acrylic Wax – Flat to help protect the artwork.

That is a quick rundown of the steps I used in creating the two pieces here.  For the next projects I will add a more step-by-step version including some tip and tricks when working with wire.

For more great pallet ideas check out WoodenPalletProjects.


 

Education, Graphite

Quick Study – Water Soluble Graphite Dancer


Quick Study

 

dancer

I continued to experiment with water soluble-graphite this week.  In this quick drawing I loosely sketched the dancer, then with a wet brush freely and quickly went over it.  After allowing the paper to dry a little, I went back and added more detail with my graphite pencil and a wet brush.  I also played with a dry brush.

Leaving the lines of the skirt open helped create movement in the dancer. Painterly motions of a wet brush also help add to this effect.  I have to admit though, I am terrible at just walking away from a drawing and saying it is done.  For me there is always something to tweak.  Therefore some of the free-flowing effects that I had, have become more detailed.  Next time I will walk away, maybe.

 

Paper:  Canson Mixed Media

Pencils:  ArtGraf 2B, 6B

 

[su_heading size=”15″ margin=”0″]Create On![/su_heading]

 

 

Education, Graphite

More Water Soluble Graphite

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Water-soluble graphite has quickly become a new favorite medium for me.  I like the richness that the graphite creates along with the freedom to add more layers and not end up with a shiny end result.  The diversity of this medium allows for quick, tight sketches like the kitten seen here, or can be utilized for loose, free-flowing sketches with a more painterly effect.  (I will post a loose sketch next week.)

Drawing detail does take some practice and experimentation.  If too much water is added to an area the graphite will bleed; I almost lost the cat’s eye on this sketch because my brush was too wet.  Drawing can be done dry, using water, or both; it all depends on what effect you want to create.

I also added an element of color to this sketch utilizing a great new drawing tool by ArtGraf.  ArtGraf produces water-soluble graphite along with pigmented water-soluble drawing mediums, most art stores and Amazon now sell this new art product from Portugal.  Here I worked with a very light wash of the pigment, however the same pigment can be used to create deep intense colors. 

 

 

Paper used:  Canson Mixed Media