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Watching – Stippling, Using Pen and Ink

Snow Leopard

Stippling with Pen and Ink

Stippling
Stippling, Snow Leopard – Pen and Ink

Many, many, many tiny dots later the leopard piece is complete.  Stippling uses tiny dots to create solid and shaded areas.  Sections that contain large concentrations of dots close together, as seen in the eyes, create depth.  Fewer dots with greater spacing are used to form the leaves producing a soft presence of the leaves. 

For this particular piece I used tinted paper.

Size: 15 X 12 completed in 2012

 

The technique of pointillism which incorporates colored dots was developed in late 1880 by George Seurat, a French  painter. http://www.georgesseurat.org/

Also check out Artsy which features 16 artworks by George Seurat, exclusive articles, related artists, and exhibit listings of Seurat works

 

Other Pen and Ink pieces on my site: 

Click on thumbnails below.

 

 

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The Process

A few people have asked me to post the process that I go through when I draw.  I know there are many methods out there, but this is what works for me.

I think the hardest part for me is deciding on the composition as a whole.  How do I want to crop or frame the subject?  What do I want to do with the foreground and background?  Sometimes it is just a matter of, am I brave enough to try execute what I visualize in my mind?  When I finally come up with some ideas I can begin drawing, and this is the fun part.

I start most drawings by blocking out shapes on my paper.  I want to be able to erase the marks later, so I am very careful to make the markings light.  If the graphite is ground too deeply into the tooth of the paper it is hard to remove.  Too much pressure from dark layout sketches can also damage the tooth of the paper.  While blocking out shapes on my paper I often squint, this allows my focus to shift from detail  to shapes and silhouettes. Once I am happy with the collection of what looks like a bunch of shapes and lines I start joining these shapes to create a line drawing of my subject. Next time I will post a photo of this step.

As the shapes are being joined I will add some shadow lines or shadow areas.  These markings become great reference points as I begin to add more detail.  The photo below is a sketch I am currently working on.  The shapes have been joined, most unwanted lines have been removed, and more detail is being added.

untitled

19×24″ Barrel Racer

In order to make the photo more visible the lines on this sketch-up have been darkened in Lightroom.  My original is much lighter.

Before I actually start adding life to the sketch I will do a few small practice areas in my sketchbook.  This helps me decide what look I want to create, and work out any problem areas before I start the actual drawing.

untitled-5

From my sketchbook

The practice drawing helped me determine what pencils I did and did not want to use and gave me a chance to try create the angled back leg.

 

 

 

As the piece evolves I will post updates on The Process.  I just have to remember to take photos as I go. 😉  …happy drawing!

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Curiosity

“The important thing is not to stop questioning.  Curiosity has its own reason for existing.”

                                                                                                 – Albert Einstein

Animal - 17  X 14 Graphite on Bristol
Animal – 17 X 14 Graphite on Bristol

The Wolf

I have always appreciated the nature of the wolf.  They are not mean and ugly creatures (from a distance).  Yes, they are wild animals and should be respected as such.  Instead, words I would use to describe them would include:  playful, social, intelligent, loyal, family orientated, and curious.    Check out the Wolf at Canadian Geographic for some great facts.

The Art

When I started this drawing it was actually on completely different paper.  I have learned not to work on my sketch at the kitchen table.  Honey, paper and graphite do not mix well. So, I started over and I am glad I did.  The original piece was on paper with a deep tooth making it hard to achieve detail.  The final sketch was done on vellum paper.  I wish I would have kept the first sketch so I could have posted the difference – next time  .