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Watching – Stippling, Using Pen and Ink

Snow Leopard

Stippling with Pen and Ink

Stippling
Stippling, Snow Leopard – Pen and Ink

Many, many, many tiny dots later the leopard piece is complete.  Stippling uses tiny dots to create solid and shaded areas.  Sections that contain large concentrations of dots close together, as seen in the eyes, create depth.  Fewer dots with greater spacing are used to form the leaves producing a soft presence of the leaves. 

For this particular piece I used tinted paper.

Size: 15 X 12 completed in 2012

 

The technique of pointillism which incorporates colored dots was developed in late 1880 by George Seurat, a French  painter. http://www.georgesseurat.org/

Also check out Artsy which features 16 artworks by George Seurat, exclusive articles, related artists, and exhibit listings of Seurat works

 

Other Pen and Ink pieces on my site: 

Click on thumbnails below.

 

 

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Pen and Ink – The Dancer: Word Art Can Add to the Beauty of Art

Pen and Ink Dancer
The Dancer

The Dancer

A few weeks ago I did a quick morning sketch of a dancer and posted it on Instagram @eisycindy. After posting, I had numerous  inquires to purchase this piece.  The quick morning sketch was done on a cheap piece of tracing paper, not something I would sell.  The interest in this piece gave me a chance to play with Hahnemuhle Sumi – E fine art paper.  The paper has a beautiful, delicate texture that I feel suits this type of drawing well.

Utilizing open lines in both the hands and the skirt helps to create a feeling of movement.  Since I have been studying letter form lately, I wanted to include words in such a way that  would add to the feel of the dancer and not distract.  Softly incorporating color in the skirt helps to increase dimension, which adds to  the free-flowing feel of the overall piece.

 

 

…love learning, learn constantly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pen and Ink

“Inaction breeds doubt and fear.  Action breeds confidence and courage.  If you want to conquer fear don’t sit at home and think about it.  Go out and get busy.”

Dale Carnegie

November has been busy, and that is good.  Since I can not post the pieces that I am working on just yet (commissions and gifts) I have decided to post a piece that I did a long time ago.

  This is my first pen and ink. 

 8 x 6 Pen and Ink

I enjoyed experimenting with the different strokes, the stippling, and the effects that can be created with ink.  What a great experience!

Coming up I have a pen and ink in progress, and eventually I will be posting the commission pieces. Busy really can be a good thing. 🙂

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Almost there…Pen and Ink

For this weeks sketch I decided I would try another Pen and Ink.    The technique used is called stippling.  Both pointillism and stippling use tiny dots to create an image.  Pointillism uses primary colors and relies on the eye and the mind to blend them when viewed from a distance.  Stippling uses dots to produce solid and shaded areas.  I am finding this piece a lot of fun, but it is more time-consuming than a sketch.  I have only posted a picture of the eye for the simple reason that the rest of the sketch has not yet been completed.   😉  Hoping to have the completed piece posted in the next couple days.

In the meantime, enjoy these pointillism pieces by Henri-Edmond Cross and Paul Signac.  Make sure you stand back from the picture when you view it to get the full effect as the eye and the mind blend the colors.

 

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Stippling: Working With Pen-and-Ink

Pointillism is a form of painting using many tiny dots of primary colors to create secondary colors.  This form of painting is very long and laborious and not a very common form used by many artists, however it does create beautiful optical results.  Even though the sleeping dog above is not “painted” using color, it is still created using many tiny dots (points) using pen and ink.  This technique is known as stippling, using dots to create a variety of less and more dense areas.  This technique creates the optical feel of depth where the dots are more concentrated.

Sleeping

In my snow leopard piece titled,Watching I also used stippling to create depth and form.

This technique was developed in late 1880 by George Seurat, a French  painter. http://www.georgesseurat.org/

Also check out Artsy which features 16 artworks by George Seurat, exclusive articles, related artists, and exhibit listings of Seurat works